Managing Depression After Retirement

Depression is one of the most prevalent mental health conditions among older adults, and a commonly made mistake in planning for retirement is not thinking about the significant emotional adjustment that takes place during this time. 

Symptoms of depression can include disturbed sleep, general sadness and a loss of interest in activities that a person used to enjoy, and these can last anywhere from weeks to a number of years – depending on whether satisfaction of life is eventually achieved or not and if an affected person has decided to seek treatment.

If you’ve been feeling depressed after stopping work and you’re unsure why, there are a few steps you can take to help address and alleviate it:

Determine why you’re Feeling Down

Several aspects can cause you to feel depressed after retirement. For example, you may think that you no longer have a sense of purpose because you’re no longer going to work each day. Alternatively, you may not be spending as much time with family and friends as you’d initially anticipated – causing you to second-guess your decision to retire. 

Spend time thinking about what could be causing you to feel depressed – it could be one or more aspects. If you’re struggling to determine the cause, consider journaling daily to track your thoughts. This will allow you to look for potential patterns or trends that may recur.

Identify Activities that you Enjoy

Along with devoting time to activities and/or hobbies you enjoy that may have been neglected during your working years, consider engaging in something new from time to time. Some ideas here include:

  • Volunteering with a charity you feel strongly about
  • Enroll in continuing education classes at a local college or even online
  • Join a senior citizen’s recreational group or sports club
  • Take up part-time employment

When deciding which activities to get involved in, consider what you need the most. Do you want to make new friends? Are you keen to feel useful somehow? Would you like to earn a little extra spending money? Would you like to engage in a little of each? The choice is yours.

Connect with Other Retirees who are Struggling to Adjust

If you’re feeling depressed after retiring, remember that you aren’t alone. There may very well be someone else in your existing social circle or network that is also struggling to adjust to the new normal of not going to work every day. 

Connecting with these people will help you support each other while dealing with the emotional and mental challenges you’re facing during your golden years. If you struggle to meet new people face to face, consider searching for retiree support groups online – these can often be just as beneficial as physical groups and activities. 

Figuring out what is most important to you during retirement and eliminating activities that may be causing you to feel depressed will go a long way in helping you to get the most out of this time of your life. Talking with a financial advisor can also help alleviate some of the financial worries you may be experiencing during retirement as well.